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DELBERT E. ANDREWS 

TO CHIEF! WHO HOLDS A VERY SPECIAL PLACE IN OUR HEARTS? 
WHO HAS TAUGHT US BY HIS OWN MANNER OF LIVING TO FACE EACH DAY WITH 
COURAGE, TO LIGHTEN ANOTHER'S CARES BY A WORD OF FRIENDLINESS 
AND CHEER, TO HAVE EACH NIGHT FIND US WITH OUR IDEALS STILL HIGH 
AND UNBROKEN, WE, THE MEMBERS OF CAMP WAWANOCK, DEDICATE THIS 
1935 ISSUE 8F PINE WHISPERS . 













MRS. DELBERT 25. ANDREWS 

Mrs. Andrew': is more than just our camp director. For 
two whole months she is our camp mother, our advisor and friend. 
It is to her we go with our joys and our troubles. Always we 
find a listening ear. With a word or smile, she eagerly shares 
our joys. With helps of many kinds, from cookies at night, to 
heart to heart talks, she shares our troubles—nothing is too 
large or twoo small for her to help us with. It is no wonder we 
like camp. It is more than just our day T s activities. It is the 
living with one who has had vision enough to look ahead into the 
years and because of this has given us visions and ideals for 
those years that lie before us. 








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Calvin Chamberlain 


Uncle Cal, as Uncle Doo for both camps, can with infinite 


patience and gentleness, extract splinters, bind, up ankles, 
and diagnose troublesome pains. As Uncle Doc, he is all profession¬ 
al and business- 1 ike, but if you want to see him as Uncle Cal, 
just we ton some day as he swims and dives , or drives tennis balls 
all over the court with deadly accuracy. 


Mrs. Haddocks 

Elspeth called Mrs, Haddocks n the nice nurse-lady", and 
that certainly was a fitting title. Never was any cut or trouble too s 
small to receive her careful attention and sympathy; and just to 
drop in to chat on her doorsteps a minute made one feel better. 

We wish she could have stayed during all of August, too, but we 
are glad that week-ends found her dropping in on us again for a 
visit and another chat. 


Mr. and Mrs. Mark Davis 

Both camps would not be half so sweet without Mrs. 

Uncle Mark. We mean this both literally and figuratively. 
Figuratively, because she is so nice herself; and literally because 
fudge and peppermint days are red-letter ones on the calendar. 

Not only does s&e keep us sweet, but she is the kindest of persons 
when clumsy fingers have dropped stitches, or knitting directions 
are needed. 

Being a skilled fisherman who comes back with as nice a 
catch as one could wish for is just a side-line for Uncle Mark. 

His skill at leading operettas is already well known, and as 
for his skill at producing marionettes shows-the fact that so many 
love to help him make marionettes, to speak the parts, and all 
look forward to every Friday night's performance, show clearly 
enough the place he holds at camp. 








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ED CASS 

In the winter time Uncle Ed is now a full-fledged 
lawyer with Esquire after his name. We have a suspicion, though, 
that he would just as soon have it summer time with Fencing 
Instructor after his name. He is a clever fencer himself, and 
because of his instructions, Wawanock fencers, too, are eager to 
stand "on guard" and cross foils with each other, and sometimes 
with Uncle Ed. 


TED FROST 

Teaching horseback riding, reading entertaining stories, 
talking to us on a Sunday morning, singing negro spirituals, telling 
of his adventures in Turkey, supervising the boys 1 log,- there, 
that is a few of the thingd Uncle Jack does for both camps. 

We like to hear him talk, we like just to have him around; 
and we like to see him sitting out on the rocks watching Jill 
round the point and dock from a two day canoe trip. 

CATHY GREEN 

No matter what Cathy does—dancing, singing, or 
anything else, she does it in a way that few of us could equal. May 
be it is because she herself reminds us so much of her own 
Scotland, the heather,^the bag pipes, the wholesome merriment 
of a cortillion in the open, which she has pictured. Anyway, 
to know Cathy is to like her. To like her is to have found a 
person who is a firm and life-long friend. 

OWEN GREEN 

It is Uncle Owen who teaches Wawanock to be straight 
shooters. Many a medal is won during camp by those who never even 
handled a gun before. Uncle Owen doesn’t realize it, but he riot 























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only teaches others to shoot straight, but by just coming in 
contact with people such as he, teaches one to think: straight and 
to appreciate the true fundamental values in life. 

WAWA GREEN 

Wawa, as Cathy so often calls her, is the ”wee one 0 , and 
yet what a grown up young lady she is from last year. To be sure, 
not every minute is sunshine to a two year old lassie, but 
when it is, how she beams and delights with everything about 
camp. And whether it is sunshine or a passing tear, camp 
delights in everything concerning Wawa. 

MISS RUSSELL 

It is hard to step in as nurse in the middle of 
the season and get used to all the calls at one’s door many, 
many times a day. 

But Miss Russell has been willing to take us as she found 
us; and adapt herself to all camp ways, which are not like 
ordinary nursing. We are glad it was she who came in August, and 
may this month be only the beginning of her friendship with us. 

KARL WOODCOCK 

We all agree with the name Uncle Karl has chosen for his 

coat of arms on his work shop door,- F IXIT , No one deserves 
more to wear on his shield the name FIXIT , and to have as its 

symbols the trusty monkey wrench and plunger. Uncle Karl not 
only can fix it, regardless of what it is, but he does it all in 

such a manner that it makes us know that chivalry belongs not 

just to ,! 7e good old knights of yore”. 

HAZEL WOODCOCK 

!, Eaz 0 l Woodcock” , cries Wawa whenever she sees Mrs. 
Woodcock ( and waves her hand). We like her for the same reasons 
that Wawa does. She always gives us the feeling that she 
likes to be with us, and is never too busy with looking after her 
small charge in the boys’ camp, and doing many things for us, to 
give a friendly smile or word, or even si;op to help us if we 
need it. 



























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THIS SIDE THE 


SWINGING DOORS 



Just look at the good-looking 
group, hub notice that evon in 
the picture lire. Bennett is keep¬ 
ing her eye on them all. That is 
the reason everything has run so 
smoothly in the dining-room all 
season . It is a sympathetic 
water over them, though, for 
the nappy expressions caught by 
the car 1 era were not put on just 
for the occasion. Rather they aa»e 
a proof of the fact that one 
who knows so well how to meet 
the hungry needs of samp and 
guests, to get trips packed and off, can also keep those who 
help her do it, fond oi her, and in good humor. 


THE OTHER SIDS THE 


SWIEMWG DOOR 


Hot ©ne of the above would we want to get along without. 
Bob and Chef are old friends, the others are new friends, and 
we hope that next July will find us again dashing through the 
kitchen ( where we do not belong) just to say "hello", and 
find them all there again. 



Introducing, back row 
standing, left to right: Mrs. Ray 
Higgins, Harry Gray, Chef Harold 
Stevens, Charlotte Oerter, Robert 
York, Front row, left to right; 
Beulah Mo Joy and Vivian Morrill/ 
Ding, dong, bell-mealtime- 
everybody rushes for the dining 
room,half starved from being out in 
the open air. With the exception 
of Vivian, it is this group above 
that has prepared to save "the day 
and the half starved people, and 
a mighty good bit of work they 
have done all summer, too. Vivian has looked after the Point, 
and helped us keep epic and span about camp. 















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GOLD MEDAL 


Gladys Young 
"Bloomerless, bloomerless, 
bloomerless," sighed Glad for two 
weeks, as letters, cards, and 
telegrams flew between here and 
Boston. Woolen bloomerless would 
be more exact. Glad is the one 
who is the executive for the Log 
and Year Book; and who approaches 
when the younger members exclaim, 
"Look out, here comes the inspector 


Sallie Dickey 

The fact that Sallie was elected captain of the Green Team 
this year proves the position she holds at camp. She, too, is a 
good all-round camper, and is always present with the proper spirit 
to match the occasion, whether it is the fun or work about the cabin, 
off on a canoe trip, or at a Saturday night dance on the Drumlin. 

Margery Dow 

Mardy is the famed Professor Rowdy Dow. She certainly is 
a professor when it comes to giving expert instructions on how to 
care for her visiting big wooly pup-especially after lights are out. 
Mardy is not rowdy, though, and her quick wit and love of fun 
have made the Gold Medal a jolly place and made us more than glad 
that she was our cabin-mate this year. 

Ellen Fairbank 

When Ellen is Ellen, she is all dignity and poise. When 
Ellen is Ollio as she is during camp, watch out. She may have the 
poise of Ellen and then again she may not—. 'Nough said, though, 
for we would not think of mentioning how she gallivants around the 
cabin, or chins herself on the rafters just to catch a poor 
little moth. 

Jane Hayward 

Zinny's tooled dragon on her leather book covers show 
how clever she could be; her squeel of delight when told she could go 
on the canoe trip showed how pleased she could be; what she did 
while on the trip showed what a good sport she could be; but what 
does the length of time it takes her to wash her face each ni^ht 
shov/T—ask Zinny. 

Mary Martha Nichols 

Dark brown hair, dark brown eyes, pleasing smile, 
clever artist—there, you that is Mary Martha. No, not quite— 
add to that a wee imp of mischief, a good camper, and a desire to 
change her pet fluffy dog's name as a result of Saturday night 
conquests—there, that is May Mat. 

Adalyn Purdy 

From the time she gets up and drags her sleepy 
councilor in for a dip, until she goes to bed, Adalyn is busy. 

Helping with Pueblo or passing silvet and gold points are all in a 
day's work for her. But all work and no play would make Adalyn a 
dull girl—the proverb says. Never fear, she knows how to play, 
especially "catch as catch can". Ask the butterflies and the moths. 



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PENOBSCOT 


Esther Frost 

Jill has found every morning 
filled with rowing and canoeing, 
and every afternoon with helping 
husband Jack teach Wawanock 
riding. We wish we could re¬ 
produce on paper Jill’s western 
manner of speech, bub we cannot. 
All we can say is that it is one 
of the many reasons why we find 
her so interesting, and why we 
like her so well. 


Mabel Estes 

Sleepy-heads in Penobscot were awakened by a 
vehementaly uttered 11 drat it 11 each morning as Mabel struggled into 
that day’s apparel. In spite of her 49 - s in riflery and her 
”drat it's ", Mabel is not really fierce at all—quite the 
contrary. As Alfreds, the hopeless maid in Sardines , or as Tarzan 
on trips and in camp, her grand sense of humor has furnished 
entertainment for nearly all of camp. 

Ruth Riley 

Knit-tap; tap;knit-tap,tap; knit-tap,tap; thus Ruth 
spends her moments when not swimming, swinging a racket, or doing 
special things such as planning and helping out with an over-night 
trip. When she is at home and not knitting, the vie is sure to 
be going, and many an impromptu audience has peeked in at the 
cabin window, to watch and admire that tap dancing. 

Marjorie Smith 

Splash ■ Puff l Puff i Life boat out of the way. Marj. 
is off on her daily jaunt to ketnnga. Object? Well the scales 
tell that story. Do not think all her energy used up that way— 
far from it. Besides doing-all there is to do about camp, she is a 
star rest hour substitute, and to do the piece of work she did as 
Little Buttercup was no small accomplishment. 

Joanne StuTl 

Cne corner of Penobscot was not half so sunny during 
August, after Jc had gone. Each day she was here found her with 
the same even disposition and the ability to be the same good 
sport in doing everything whether she happened to be especially 
fond of it or not . Remember those dishes of cooked cereal, Jo? 

Betty Tucker 

One great ambition was Betty's when she came back to 
camp,-namely to play the part of Josephine in Pi nafor e, and 
now that ambition has teen fulfilled and very well fulfilled, too. 
Betty, the dramatic, would have received this comment with a 
smile and a fluttering of her hand to her heart. But Betty the 
camper would say, "Thanks, but never mind that. I am simply 
starved.” And would she eat j 











































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CAYUGA 


Edna Chamberlain 
When Edna dons a play suit and 
puts a ribbon on to hold those 
curls in place, she is in danger of 
being taken for a very charming 
member of some first intermediate 
cabin. This Mrs. Cal, though, 
can expertly teach anyone how to 
paddle, do figure eights, and 
salute, too. What is a canoe trip 
like with her in charge? Ask 
anyone who goes. You will find 
she has their salute and three 
cheers besides. 

Jean Dickey 

If you want to see a picture of color and fun, you should 
see Jean with her tan, her pink rubber bathing suit, sitting 
on her blue rubber raft and splashing for dear life for the 
ke.tonga, with Professor perched on behind giving instructions. 

If you want to watch a good indoor sport, you ;should see Jean 
knitting that red mitten, or being a star magician in vaudeville 
night. 

Carolyn Longshore 

Quick, energetic, curious-those adjectives fit Carolyn. 

Her curiosity, however, is not inquisitiveness, but tends toward 
one field,-namely tugs. Really all nature questions appeal to 
her, but are far from being her only interest. The three above 
adjectives are also reasons why so many points on that medal 
were completed, and why Carolyn still found time for so many 
other activities. 



Marjorie Palmer 

Just look .* Wh© is that camper with the auburn curly hair, 
brown eyes with a twinkle in them, and a voice and laugh that has 
almost a soft Southern drawl to them. Well as I live, if it isn’t 
a grown-up edition of the camper who used to be in Osage long 
ago. But I’ll bet that twinkle is still the barometer for— 
all right, I’ll be good. I’ll not tell. 

Lorraine Philbrick 

When Lorraine is a bit disgruntled, maybe because those 
daily post cards did not arrive, she can accomplish more with a 
look than most people can with volumes. Lorraine, however, is 
seldom disgruntled, because life in Cayuga, riding, playing, tennis, 
putting Logs together, or knitting that jiffy sweater, keeps 
her too busy for anything like that. 

Elizabeth Sweetland 

It takes more than a bull’s eye to freighten Betty. She 
just stares right at it and pulls the trigger. Another report of 
the gun, another target, another reason for Betty being one of 
Wawanock’s star shooters. And as for her part as Phylis-what 
a good eloping heroine- she made. But as the keeper of Oscar— 
my, my, how can one lose a possession so much. 











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NARRAGANSETT 



Estelle Litchfield 

Stel is camp’s outstanding 
blond. She is anything but languid, 
however; for head of rowing, 
assistant in swimming, taking 
charge of sports, knitting suits, 
and reading umpteen letters is 
enough for any languid cure. Oh, 
yes,—ever see Stel and Lucia doin' 
Danish gymnastics on rainy days?— 
’nough said. No languid lady here. 


Carol Hoar 

Life’s minor irritations rest lightly on Carol's 
shoulders and we hope they always will. Whether waiting tables, 
or just about camp, she is always singing her way through each 
day. Who wouldn't sing, too, if they could play the part of 
Hebe in the operetta as Carol did. 

Edna Riley 

First place for the broadest grin-going, going, gone. 
Winner, Hiss Edna Riley. Remember that night? It must be that 
dash of freckles, or those merry Irish blue eyes that makes the 
grin so broad. Maybe it is because she plays hard all day and 
helps others many times without thinking about it. Anyway, we'd 
give her another first prize—a lolly pop— and watch her grin 
again. 

Barbara Sellew 

"Now, dearies, I’ll tell you", says Barbara as she 
flourishes a knitting needle and answers a question she was not 
asked. Clever answers, too,, and they keep the fun arolling. But 
we will ask Barbie this one directly; "What comes in your letters 
and smells like Wrigleys? Contraband goods?" But why ask; 
it could not be. 

Marjorie Sullivan 

No one would ever guess from the way she has gone 
about things, that this was Marjie's first year as a camper. 
Friendly and agreeable about camp, fitting in with every sport 
and activity, this red-headed member of Narragansett has been 
more than a pleasure to watch from day to day. Wawanock—1935— 
pleasant memories—rigjjt .' 


Lois Wallen 

Lois appears as a quiet young lady most of the time, 
but do not let that fool you. No one has a greater appreciation 
of a good time, or is more ready for fun, than she. We are 
having fun, too, when we say that especially at night is Lois 
a busy camper, for what would happen if the same number of curls 
did not appear at breakfast the next morning? 





































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DAKOTA 



Ruth Wheldon 

Behold.' This curly red-haired 
councilor teaches campers how to 
produce angels on horseback and 
other such miracles. It is she 
who tells them what menus enliven 
trips at meal time, and it ic she 
who shows them how to prepare 
these menus. But if you waive to 
see Ruthie smile, just bring her 
the right letter, and watch the 
reaction. 


Judy Andrews 

How Judy dislikes hiking, but hike Judy most certainly 
does. At least she thought she would never, never get to the end 
of the Mount Appetite hike. Would it lead to a big appetite? Judy 
hoped not, for loosing weight was her object. She , in her 
imitations, is Ed Wynn, Zazu Pitts and the Goldbergs all rolled 
into one; so we do not want her to be any smaller, for then there 
would be less of humorous Judy. 

Beverly Bavier 

When Bev starts laughing, just do not try to stop her. 

It is no use, for soon you will find yourself laughing with her. 

It has been the same in everything. Because she so readily 
shares with others, re have found ourselves enjoying with her 
all she has done this summer. All? No, not quite. We 
escaped that waste barrel week—Bev did not. 

Doris King 

Ah .' the mystery camper of Dakota. When does she sweep? 
Mystery still unsolved. Sweep Doris certainly did, but at what 
time she did it, kept her cabin guessing. That quiet smile as 
answer told them nothing. That smile, though, was the answer 
to a happy life at Wawanock from one who helped make"Wawanock 
happy too. 


Marcia McCarthy 

Imagine an old camper going on a picnic, falling into 
the lake very easily , and having to come back with her sweater 
on over her feet. But Marcia took it with the same grin that is 
so characteristic of her, and thought it good fun. Although 
being generous is another of her strong points, we wonder if 
that score was not evened up somehow. We have our ideas .' 



































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CHEROKEE 


Margaret Andrews 
Remember the sail boat? Peg was 
a partner in the building of that. 
Ever notice how we$l it was built? 
Everything Peg does is like that, 
be it early morning bird walks, 
pitching pup-tents, or anything 
else. Ever notice how saucily the 
boat sails in the breeze? Can’t 
exactly say that of Peg, but ever 
notice those merry blue eyes 
under that saucy hair cut? That 
twinkle is not there for nothing, 
we assure you. 



Nancy Loder 

Nancy's part in the cabin play was to her taste—three 
cookies and a slice of lemon, to be exact. But do not let her 
nonchalant humor hide the real Nancy. Parts, clever skits and 
plays are not performed by no effort; neither are Bronze Medals 
passed by humor. Without much ado, Nan gets a lot done, and at 
the same time makes life a jolly affair for herself and those 
around her. 

Marian Piirinton 

Marian would never tell you that tennis and dancing 
were two of her strong points, but we will. Wil 1 she tell you 
about splinters and playing among the cabin rafters, or about that 
sweater she started, let’s see— guess even we will not tell how 
many times. We will tell you that Cherokee certainly missed her 
when she went at the end of July, but hope that next year will 
find her back again with them. 

Lucy Sampson 

"CHOCOLATE CAKE",yelled Lucy at the top of her voice. 

No, it was not hunger; it was just another bit of good acting this 
cabin play revealed to us. Lucy has revealed something else to 
us, too. Ever notice the cute way she has of wrinkling up her 
nose, especially when she smiles? Ever notice that she smiles 
often? What we like is Lucy-smiles, wrinkled nose-everything. 












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ALGONQUIN 



Carolyn Blake 

When you see a tall blond with 
shade hat and tennis racket, do not 
ask who it is. Of course, it could 
be no other than Carol, who is so 
enthused herself about tennis that 
she has made many a camper that way 
too, and has taught them a bit of 
fun that they will find themselves 
using in the days to come when they 
are not at camp. 


Charlotte Calahan 


What would we do without Charlotte who is always here and 
there, a real M Johny on the spot”. This year she not only enjoys 
outdoor activities as she always has done, but has joined camp 
in its knitting spree. She is a busy person with all her regular 
classes, her knitting, and keeping an eye on three brothers in 
Damariscotta. 


Jean Ferrell 

'*Oh, those golden slippers” , all of Wawanock said as 
Jean went into a rythmic tap dance. Without golden slippers, but 
with the same grace and enthusiasm, Jean tackles everything from 
making Algonquin floor shine each day to putting on skit nights. 

And as for having a sweet tooth—oh .‘ oh l 

Jean Harriman 

Cheerful and ever willing to help- that is Jean and we 
eagerly waited for the middle of July and her to arrive. No matter 
what the day or weather, she is happy all the time, and with true 
camper spirit enjoys what may be at hand: a canoe trip, a bird walk, 
or just ordinary moments about camp. You should see those book 
ends she finished. They alone speak for what she can do. 

Lydia Longshore 

Lydia of the blond curls is another sunshine maker for 
Algonquin. Always tearing here and there, she often may be seen 
with a skinned elbow or shin. But these are mere details, for 
nothing can smother her infectious giggle or merry disposition, 
not even rest hour. 










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OEAHA 


Lucia Rose 

When Lucia looks serious but 
with a humorous quirk to it— J .' 
Anything from the highland-fling to 
a snatch of a rollicking tune may 
result. Ho one loves fun more 
than this Fosse-Hissen lass,and 
no one is mere skillful than she 
at teaching swimming or thinking 
up stunts to liven up any dull 
moments that dare try to creep 
into camp. 


Beverly Haddocks 

Bev is the peppy young lady who occupies the front 
corner of Omaha and keens them costed on what goes on outside. 
This occupies only very odd moments, however, for Bev is a busy 
oabin-member with all her classes and her knitting. And if 
you want the words to a song created in no time, just ask her— 
and presto .'It is all done for you. 



Ann Pettingell 

Omaha’s spokesman is Ann. Not only has she represented 
them in serious Council Fire talks, but many times all summer 
has she royally entertained them with humorous monologues in the 
oabin. Camp would miss Ann if she stayed, away, and apparently 
Ann is missed while here, for goodness gracious me—where do all 
of those letters arrive from? 


Betty Willey 

If you are looking for a sprinter, here is Betty who 
practices in making classes in record time. If you are looking 
for a fisherman, here again is Bet who practices for hours with 
a pole, her bed, and the cabin floor. She is a really true 
fisherman, too. If you want someone who is most willing to 
help out anywhere she can, again we tell you—Betty is the girl 
to find. 



















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SHAWNEE 



Ellen Bailey 

You do not know what piano 
playing is until you have known 
Ellen." Juet hum a + une to her 
and presto . she is running it 
over on the piano. Her days were 
filled with many things, tor she 
kept Shawnee happy and busy, often 
led a group singing along on a 
hike, and with a merry smile set 
camp off on the right tune. 


Katherine Andrews 

Kathie deserves merit as Shawnee’s life-saver. With thfcee 
new cam'oors and a new councillor, who knows what disastrous catastro 
phies might have befalled Shawnee. But none did, however, for 
aided oy Kathie‘s Knowledge and cheerful willingness to help out, 
not only were wrinkles smoothed out of the first few weeks; but 
none were allowed to appear for the rest of the season. 


Sally Ann Cameron 

To her surprise, sometime that twinkle of hers giggled right 
out loud. But that twinkle has been the reason Sally has kept 
things going in earnest in the cabin and about camp. Swimming 
to the ketonga early in the season was just one of the signs of 
,f she came, sne saw, she conquered n camp and all its doings, 


Patricia Damon 

Any one who co-operated as well as- 
frowning. We doubt if anyone ever saw 
when she drew the lot of making a. s; - esc 
Her lively stories and singing made Pat 
Snawnee’s cheery members. 


Pat had no time for 
her frown ell summer, 
h fci the whole cabin, 
another one of 


even 


Ellen Wiggins 


Ellen was one of the first intermediates* star baseball 
players and what games they had/ All are certainly glad Ellen 
decided to stay all summer, for the cabin wcuid not have been 
complete without her end teddy, though we susuoot that this 
fellow served as a foot warmer on some cold nights. And what 
was bhawnee’s loss was Algonquin's gain when they moved into 
there the last two weeks ci camp. 














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PUEBLO 



Mr s ...Steel 




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Bamari ecotta and Ua waneck; tut 
Mrs. Steel has smilingly done so 
all summer. A si: her, though, 
what the first Sunday and rainy 
day rising bells did to her 
mental composure J 


Betsy Bennett 

11 Why, oh why, does hair have to snarl”? must have been 
Betsy*s every morning lament. But even this could r_ot cause her to 
pause and lament long; for her weeks here wer* too busy asking 
questions, learning,answers, winning swimming races, riding— 
in fact, taking in juoo everything from rising bell 'till taps. 


Eleanor 01ayton 

Eleanor shewed marked skill with a gun, and though a 
first intermediate, she won her Pro-marksman Medal. Horseback 
riding, too, held a cherished place in her list of activities. 
No moment, however, was allowed to slip by unnoticed, and how• 
those edd times during a day were hilarious ones when filled 


with games that Eleanor or all 


Ox 


Pueblo could so well think up. 


Constance Sawyer 

As the only second year camper in Pueblo, Connie often 
was heard to say, "You ought not to do that”, or ”You should 
not do this*? so with a cheerful smile and pleasing manner she has 
been ever helpful. This camper ie a good example of one who 
has every day filled to the brim making camp life a great 
adventure for herself and those around her. 


Alice Steel 


Dark brown eyes and curls, and a dark skin has Alice, 
which made her look like a little Indian maiden truly as she 
filed into the Council Ring, She has been busy 
learning to swim and in taking in all camp life 
that another summer will find her again leaving 
home for camp and possibly bringing others from 


nj.ly 

this summer 
We hope 
her Western 
the West with her. 


Dale Sturdy 

"Tell us a story—a ghost story or a story about your 
cat Timmy”, is a frequent request from cabin mates while waiting 
for lights out at night. Dale very obligingly complied and told 
her stories unusually well. Could that talking in their sleep 
about twelve o'clock be due to the story telling? Anyway 
it wa3 good work, Dale, in that, and all else you did. 


























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OSAGE 



Mrs. Sawyer 

If you see Aunt Betty about camp 
with paper and a pencil in hand, do 
not be alarmed. It probably means 
that another good evening program 
is in the making. Ah, if on the 
other hand you see her with red tags 
and a pencil—watch out Penobscot 
and Gold Medal. There is not space 
to tell you how much fun is stored 
up in this one charming, petite 
person—the best way is to know her 
and to share the fun. 


Janet Benson 

Our Janet’s quick imaginative mind has been the source of 
many play hour plans, and every week has found this loyal member of 
the Green team writing an account for the Log. So you can rest 
assured, we will not soon forget this Osage cabin-mate with her 
nice braids, the bead head bands, and her distinct manner of sppech. 

Florence Davis 

Florence does nothing by half measures. From the time 
she wakens, she is whole-heartedly ready for what the day may bring 
forth. Rowing and dancing in the morning; games, making furniture, 
or maybe a picnic in the afternoon—no matter what the activity , 
she enters into it and gets from it always fun and a perfect time. 

Harriet Kirk 

After Camp and Happy got adjusted to each other, what a 
camper she made ! Inspection time—a spotless corner; swim time— 
the very first junior to conquer swimming; meal time—a hungry 
Happy from playing so hard all day; bed time—still a smiling but 
tired Happy who tucks herself quickly into bed*and drops off to 
sleep for another Happy day that is coming. 

Ruth Martin 

From the tops of her head to the tips of her toes, Ruth 
is all sunshine. Merrily she skips through each day and takes 
whatever it has to offer. Merrily, too, she skips to big brother 
Fred and takes what he has to offer—nice shiny nickles for each 
pound gained. So weighing day has found Ruth happier than ever, 
for who would not be with those bright nickles as award. 

Jean Willey 

Jean was the only Junior who took riding, was the one 
who thought she did not like it, and was the one who changed her 
mind. We are glad, for there are few things Jean does not do. 
Energetic and never seeming to tire is Jean; and from morning to 
night has contributed much to Junior Row. 




































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MOHAWK 


\ 



Mrs. Benson 

How one person can keep her 
eye on so much art work and so 
many juniors is more than we know. 
With a low spoken word or a clap 
of the hands, she has her young 
group off on some occupation, or 
gleefully following her in a game. 
With a bit of help or good advice, 
she has the older group off on 
tooling leather, or other bits 
of art work. And in both cases 
she is equally successful. 


Jean Andrews 

Just because Jeannie won the crab race in the track meet does 
not mean she is a crab, far from it. This junior member, who 
is an old camper, is not still from morning to night, and has no 
time or disposition for crabbing. Just as last year, she enters 
everything with a vira and vigor, and every day finds her as ready 
for it as the day before. 


Elspeth Benson 

Bright shiny curls, roguiBh blue eyes, tip-toeing*finger 
on lips-sh .' Elspeth has come to whisper a secret. Maybe she 
slept in rest hour;raaybe they are going on the buggy ride; maybe she 
is playing the spider in "Little Miss Muffet"- but sh ! it is a 
secret-we will not tell what it is-sh J 

Martha Little 

Martha*s at first very shy smile has grown and grown this 
summer as she has romped and played with eight other little 
juniors. Swimming, helping Jean empty the barrel, playing in the 
doll house- all these things and many more which make up a 
day's work and fun are the reasons that smile has grown. 

Carol Woodcock 

When Carol's eyes grow big and her toes just will not let 
her stand still, you know she is pleased. It is no wonder those 
toes will not stay still when they can dance so gracefully as 
they do. And it is no wonder those eyes grow big when Carol, 
all attention, is a thrilled member of the rhythm band. 



















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AUGUST CAMPERS 



Kan, like her last name, reminds us of a breath of sea 
air. Prom the first, she whole-heartedly took up camp life. Before 
a week was out, our camp songs and our camp spirit were one-hundred 
percent hers. May next July, bringing with it camp season, find 
Nan with her trunk packed ready to come before the second month beerin^ 
NANCY HERR MOHAWK 


Here is another Nan of whom we have grown very fond in a 
short time. Her coming made ten jolly Juniors; and one would never 
gues3, as she cherrily fixes her corner in the cabin, and joins the 
other nine in their play and classes, that this was her first ex¬ 
perience at camp and away from home. 

ELISA3ETH JEFFERS CHEROKEE 


My., what a good-looking sweater you are going to have— 
but lock r no swearer there at all. It seemed all right to us but 
was not, so Betty decided to take it out. I fear not all of us 
would have had the determination to do that. Neither could all 
of us step into camp in August and make friends as readily as 
Eetty has done. 

JEAN JEFFERS SHAWNEE 

Did you see Jean as the sleeping beauty in that skit 
night? That shows the opposite Jean from real life. No, we do not 
mean the beauty part. We mean the sleeping part, for Jean finds 
the day too interesting to sleep in it. And then again we heard that 
the real Jean talks in her sleep, and the play Jean did not. 

Can that be so? 

MARY JONATHAN SHAWNEE 


Mary did not remain with us for long, but we hope she 
liked her stay here as much as we enjoyed having her. Once adjusted + 
to camp, she entered everything in a way that makes us say, "Come bad 
again, Mary. We will all be looking for you next vear.” 

ALICE PAUL ~ ALGONQUIN 

Alice and Algonquin are both more than pleased that 
she came to get acquainted with camp. It did not take long to 
learn that the same qualities that make her a good cabin-mate , 
make her a good camper, for good naturedly and enthusiastically 
she welcomes each moment with its new or old activity. 

SARAH JANE W11DMAN CHEROKEE 

In July, Sarah Jane stayed only a week, and then left 
for a long trip.. During that week those in Omaha learned how 
alert and prompt she was. That promptness brought her right 
back to us in August, ai:d then that alertness made her an 
active participator in all we have done. 





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July 13- 


Baseball 


On this Saturday afternoon directly after rest hour all of 
camp climbed into the big truck and were off to Jefferson ball 
field for the annual Green and Buff competition baseball game. 

Under the direction of Umpire Peg Andrews and the two captains 
the game was soon under way. Both sides were evenly matched and 
no spectacular play was made by either team. 

During the second inning neither pitcher allowed any hits. 

At the end of the third inning the score stood three to three. 

From that time on, however, the Greens forged steadily ahead. 
Possibly it was the punch Mrs. Andrews brought down between innings 
for the teams, or possibly it was just that they decided to play 
baseball harder than they had been* At any rate, by the end of 
the game, the score stood 9-3 in favor of the Greens. Thus the 
Greene won the first competition meet and chalked up five points 
on the team scores. 


The team line up was 



GreenB 

Bfcff 8 

P.-S. Dickey 

M. Nichols 

0.-K.McCarthy 

M. Dow 

1st base 

, L. Philbrick 

A. Purdy 

2nd " 

B. Sweetland 

J. Dickey 

3rd n 

J. Hayward 

E. Fairbank 

Sc S.- 

C. Longshore 

C. Hoar 

M. Palmer 

R. F.~ 

N. Loder 

M. Estes 

L. Fc- 

M. Sullivan 

R. Riley 

CI. F.- 

Betty Tucker 

Lois Wallen 

JULY 20- 

-BA3KET 5ALL 



It was two-fifteen. Estelle and Lucia, with whistles ready, 
stood waiting for captains and teams to have the last conference. 

A whistle blew, Marjorie Sullivan and Mabel Estes stretched tall 
for the ball. The game was on. Under the trees, sitting together 
by teams, those Buffs and Greens not playing lustily cheered their 
colors on. 

Not once did the play slow up. Adalyn Purdy, aided by the 
good passing of all the team, piled up point after point for the 
Buffs, while Sallie Dickey was high point scorer for the Greens. 

During the second half of the game, the throw in at center 
was used instead of the jumping for the ball. During this half the 
Greens crept up on the Buffs more than they did in the first half. 
The game ended with a score of thirty to twenty for the Euffs. By 
the end of this Saturday's game, the points were nearer because 
each team had won one of the two games played. 

The line up was the following; 


C. 

R. 

L. 

S, 


M.* 

F.- 

F.- 

C.- 


Re G.~ 
L. C. 


Greens 
Sullivan 
S. Dickey 

Longshore 

McCartnv 
Longsnore 

Hurriman 

Hoar 

Hayward 

Phil brick 


*: 

J. 

0 . 


Buffs 
M. Estes 
A. Purdy 
Nichols 
Fairbank 


M. 

E. 

J. 


Ferrell 


R. Riley 
J. Dickey 
















































JULY 27—SERVICE BALL 


The servus bet was stretched between the pines, the ground 
marked off, and two-fifteen found both Buff and Greens readv to 
start. Carolyn Blake was in the perilous position of referee as 
the score went first in favor of one side and then the other. 

At the close of the first quarter the Greens had three points 
and the Buffs none. Spurred on by this lead the Buffs held the 
Greens from scoring once while they piibed up seven points. 

Again the Greens took the lead, held the Buffs from making any 
more points and ended the third quarter with a score of thirteen. 
Fate must have been against the Greens, and playing with the Buffs, 
for once more in the fourth quarter they forged ahead and when 
Carolyn sounded the final whistle another competition game had gone 
to the Buffs with a total score of twenty to fifteen. 


AUGUST 3—BASEBALL 


With the sound of the rest hour whistle still in their ears, 
one and all in Wawanock climbed into the covered wagon and headed 
for Jefferson and another exciting big league game on the real 
ball field. 

Adalyn pitched fob the Buffs, Sallie pitched for the Greens, 
and the end of the first inning a score of 2-2 made both teams tense 

With renewed determination the Buffs want back on the field* 
and, before the astonished eyes of the Greens, piled up three 
more runs. The Greens, not to be outdone, made just as many runs as 
the Buffs had, and the excited cheers of the team supporters urged 
both sides to break the tie. It looked for awhile as though 
the Greens were on their way to victory; but with the Greens 
only one point ahead, it was still anybody's game. 

The Greens lost one or two chances on errors, while the Buffs 
drew steadily into the lead. At the end of the fifth, and most 
exciting inning of all the game, the score was eight to seven in 
favor of the Buffs. 

The line up was; 



Greens 

Buff s 

p.- 

S. Dickey 

A. Purdy 

c.~ 

M.McCarthy 

M. Dow 

1st- 

• J. Harriman 

E. Fairbank 


L. Phi'lbrick 


2nd- 

• E. Pweetiand 

J. Dickey 

3 rd- 

J. Hayward 

B. Eavier 

S.S. 

- C. Longshore 

M. Palmer 


C. Hoar 


C.F, 

* B. Tucker 

R. Riley 

L J, 

- M. Sullivan 

M. Nichols 

R,F. 

- N.Loder 

L.Wallen 


AUGUST 9—FIRST INTERMEDIATE BASEBALL GAME 

The first intermediates were great baseball enthusiasts and 
not to be out done in competition by the older groups, held their 
own game back of the Lodge on Friday afternoon, Auwust ninth. 

The excitement ran high; good baseball was played in spite of the 
fact that balls were chased everywhere from under canoes to the 
tree tops; and many home runs were scored. 



















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When Ruthie brought the game to a close after the final inning 


it was learned that the Greens had 
for the score stood 13-14. 

The line up was— 

Buffs 

C.~ Beverly Haddocks 
P.~ Betty Willey 
1st.- Anne Pettingell 
2nd.- Connie lawyer 
3rd.- Jean Jeffers 
Fielder- Betsy Bennett 


won by a low margin of one run, 


Greens 

Sally Cameron 
Nancy Dorey 
Ellen Wiggins 
Kathie Andrews 
Pat Damon 
Eleanor Clayton 


AUGUST 10—TRACK. MEET 

* 

On your mark, get set, go J They were off on the senior relay. 
It was over—the Greens had won and the afternoon was off on the 
Annual Buff and Green Track-Meet. 


Every camper from Mohawk to the Gold Medal took part and 
each one did her very best for the Buff or Green. 



Outstanding- events of the afternoon were the junior crab 

race, 

the wheel barrow race, and the sack 

race. 

These required 

quite 

a bit of skill, it is true, but they 

al so 

furnished quite 

bit of amusement for those watching. 




The following’ is a complete record of 

events and of winners 

I. 

BENIOR RELAY 

Greens 

2* 

Second Intermediates 25 yd.Dash 

1. 

Beverly Bavier 



2. 

Jean Harriman 



3. 

Betty Jefferd 

3. 

Wheel barrow race— 

1 . 

Anne Pettingell 




Beverly Haddocks 



2. 

Alice Steel 




Eleanor Clayton 



3. 

Kathy Andrews 




Pat Damon 

4, 

Crab Race 

1 . 

Jean Andrews 



2. 

Carol Woodcock 



3. 

Florence Davis 

5. 5. 

Basket Ball Throw 

1 . 

Mabel Estes 



2. 

Adalyn Purdy 

6. 

Sack Race 

1 . 

Marcia McCarthy 



2. 

Doris King- 



3. 

Nancy Loder 

7. 

1st Intermediate Dash 

1 . 

Betty Willey 



2. 

Ellen Wiggins 



3. 

Nancy Dorey 

8. 

Potato Race 

1 . 

Happy Kirk 



2. 

Jean Willey 



3„ 

Janet Benson 

9. 

Broom Stick Relay 

BUFFS 

10. 

Basket Ball Relay 

GREENS 

11. 

Senior Dash 

1 

_L e 

Edna Riley 



2. 

Mary Nichols 


TOTAL SCORE GREENS 40-BUFFS 49 

3. 

Hardy Dow 













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AUGUST 12--SWIM MEET 


The weather man was indeed thoughtful. The swim meet was 
planned for Monday, so he gave us the first really fair one of the 
season. At ten o’clock all of camp was ready and waiting on the 
bridge. Lucia had life boats and passenger boats ready. The 
judges had arrived. The whistles blew. The Meet was on. 

Good speed swimming- was demonstrated. Strokes for form showed 
many with almost perfect fejr/le. And the underwater found Mardy 
Dow once again swimming almost all over the lake before coming 
to the top. 

The obstacle race made all the contestants hungry for they had 
boiled eggs which they had to hold on a spoon in their mouths 
out of water as they were swimming. 

The summary of the meet: 


1 . 

25 Yd. Dash 

1 . 

Sallie Dickey 



2. 

Jean Harriman 



3. 

Marcia McCarthy 

2. 

10 yard Dash 

1 . 

Ellen Wiggins 



2. 

Ann Pettinsell 



3. 

Patsy Damon 

3. 

Side Stroke for form 

1 . 

Mabel Estes 


Older Group 

2. 

Marjorie Sullivan 



3. 

Edna Riley 


Younger group 

1 . 

Betsy Bennett 


2. 

Kathy Andrews 



3. 

Charlotte Calahan 

4. 

Dog Paddle (Juniors) 

1 . 

Happy Kirk 



2. 

Jean Willey 



3. 

Janet Benson 

5. 

Obstacle Race Relay 

1 . 

L.Philbrick 



2. 

Adalyn Purdy 



3. 

M.McCarthy 

6. 

Underwater 

1 . 

Mardy Dow 


. 

2. 

Carol Hoar 



3. 

Edna Riley 

7. 

Trudgeon for form 

1 . 

Sallie Dickey 



2. 

Ellen Eeirbank 

8. 

Crawl for form 

1 . 

Mary Nichols 



2. 

Sallie Dickey 

9. 

Swan Dive 

1 . 

Mary Nichols 



2. 

Lydia, Longshore 

10. 

Jack Dive 

1 . 

Mary Nichols 



2. 

Jean Harriman 

11. 

Plain front Dive 

1 . 

Betty Tucker 



2. 

Jean Harriman 



3. 

Marjorie Palmer 

AUGUST 19—Water Meet 




To bathing suits. to boat 3 , 

to canoes, 

and away. Away? 

How 

far? Down by the bridge, no lees. 

the Water 

Meet on this 

f air 

Monday was in prc.gresj. 























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And what a meetj Amid enthusiastic cheers, Greens and 5uffs 
paddled and rowed as they never had before. Surprise spills were 
taken out of canoes and then the wisdom of donning bathing suite 
was well borne out. 

The funniest event was the boat obstacle race in which the two 
contestants in each boat, half wa.y to the finish line, changed 
places and clothes, and then continued on to the end. 

The obstacle race, in canoes, got off to several false starts 
because the Buffs forgot to throw their paddles out of the canoes 
and then jump out after them. In the end they were defeated by the 
Greens because one paddle could not be found for some time. 

Because the Greens took this meet 6-2, the competition points 
of the teams were brought closer together. 

Water meet summary; 

1. Canoe tandem 


2. Boat Race (singles) 

3. Obstacle Canoe Race 


4. Double Back Water 
6 c Canoe Singles 

6 . Boat obstacle 


7. Gunnelling 


8 . Canoe sinking 


AUGUST 2#—TENNIS 

The climaac of the tennis season was reached in the 
Buff and Green play off for the championship. 

Besides the tournament play-off a demonstration was held 
to shew what has been accomplished this year. Putting a ball into 
play was demonstrated by the first intermediates; the second inter¬ 
mediates showed the forehand drive, and the seniors the backhand 
and serve. 

The ladders of the two tournaments, the second inter¬ 
mediate doubles, and the senior singles, were as follows: 


Greens 

Sweetland 

Philbrick 

Greens 

L. Longshore 
Greens 

C, Longshore 
J. Harriman 
Buffs 

B. Willey 
Buf f s 

A. Purdy 
Greens 

M. Sullivan 
E. Riley 

Greens 

L. Longshore 
J. Hayward 

Greens 

M. Smith 

B. Tucker 












































SECOND INTERMEDIATES DOUBLES TOURNAMENT 


BUFFS 


C. Calahan ; 

D. Kins V 


J. Ferrell 
L. Sampson 

E. Bovier 
5. Jeffers 


0 


Round 1 
J. Ferrell \ 

L. Sampson \ 


Round 2 


Finals 




3. Eovier 
B. Jeffers 


JD, 

E, 


.tovier 

Jeffers 


J- Andrews 
E . At 


tucker 


M. McCarthy 

N. Loder 


GREENS 

^ M. McCarthy j 
j N. Loder / 





J. Harriman 
L. Longshore 


J. Harriman 
L. Longshore j 



M. Me Carthy 

N. Loder 


SENIOR SINGLE TOURNAMENT 

BUFFS 

% Round 1 ^ Round 2 


Round 3 


Round 4 


Ellen Fairbanks E. Fairbank 
Lois Wallen^/. 

Barbara £ellew - 
Ruth Riley R. Riley 


Default ! 


M. Nichols \ 
M. Palmer ^ 

J. Dickey ( 
A. Purdy j 

M. Dow ^ 

M. Estes j 


M. Palmer \ 

/ 

A. Purdy J 
M. Estes 


Purdy 


A.Purdy ) 


Purdy 


M, 


Estes 


M. Estes 


GREENS 


B. 3weetland( 
E. Riley j 

E. 

Riley S 

*N 

C. Longshore l 
B. Tucker 

C. 

Longshore 

M. SullivarTV 

J. Kajnr&rd _ 

L. Philbrick l 

M. 

Sullivan } 

I 

C. Hoar J 

Default / 

S* Dickey j- 
M. Smith j 

S. 

Dickey 


E.Riley ) 

c 




Sullivan j 


S. Dickey 


E. Riley j 
V 


8 . Dickey 



8 . Dickey 


The i'inals in the competition for form was— 

1. Putting the ball in play- Betty Willey 

2. Forehand Drive-Beverly Bavier 

3. Backhand-Edna Riley 

4. Serve-Adalyn Purdy 

The play-off in the lenior Singles was won by Adalyn Purdy 






















AUGUST *** Rifl«ry - 

For the Buff and Green competition. Uncle "Owen and 
the captains chose the five best shooters on each team. These five 
shoe at a five bull’s eye target and had two turns for each 
bull's eye. In this way they were shooting for a possible 
score of one hundred. 

Elizabeth Uweetland, who has won her sixth bar on her 
p.hn-p .^hooter medal, was high point scorer. 

The total individual line-up showed the following 

scores: 


GREEN 


1 . 

8 . 

Dickey 

68 

r* 

o . 

E. 

Sweetland 

88 

3. 

E. 

Riley 

56 

4. 

M, 

Sullivan 

80 

5. 

M. 

Smith 

71 


Total 363 



BUFF 


1 . 

M. Nichole 

81 

2 . 

M. Estes 

78 

3. 

M. Palmer 

77 

4. 

M. Dow 

68 

5. 

A. Purdy 

84 


total 388 


LOG; 

As in past years, the Log again counted in the team scores. 

The Greens have contributed a great number of articles 
each week; and Betty Tucker, a Green, has earned the greatest 
number of best articles. 


The final points awarded from Log articles were: 


3 


GREENS-8 























Andrews 


COUNCIL FIRE 


Slowly to the beat of the tom-tony-the Buff., and JGx^en 
branches of the Wawanock tribe file into their Coitocil Ring 
every Friday night. Wrapped in theIndian i^lrankei^, heaoK^*^ 
bands full of feathers, led by the "two team captains, they make 
impressive appearance for the beginning of this ^e®emorlTai. 

Once their teams are sea>rbd, the two captaips /bpkk / 
their placed besides Mrs. Andrews.' Shis is/for fche' ayajrgfi 
of feathers to those who havk. so lived (jVhlera 

have earned their social poigrt for the'week. - As Mrs 
reads the names, the members^ come to their cap)tain who givg 
them another bright feather for their head* diess. In ' / / 

the case of new campers, af\ter they have /drawn feather to/ 
decide whether they are to b^ Grjsen or Bjifr, (thjey^st awk;rd 
is a head band and center feathkr of thfeVt4am\ colors. 

• < / 1 \' 

The programs that have taken place After 1 ' 
ceremony have all been vpjK^ed and iptkreAtin 
stories have been told. / One eveninig wpsibp 
the qualities a good ca^in mate shpfuld^pbskeps 
Cabin put on a skit, which 'Showed iihe Value/of 
and the danger of forect fires^ J \ \ ' / 

One of the outstanding,^ouicil'^ires/tha 
vividly in our memoi/ies is the nig^t 1 Chief^xfn 
headdress and blanket,/ '“stood up beside the totem pole and 
spoke to us on being /square; His talk alone was impressive, 
but Chief, standing/ Wtra/igh't gfnd v tall/,/silhouetted against a 
ikv. was /even ,‘mo^e im-nres^d.vka true example o: 




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rosy-hued sky, wa's /eten jmoj^e impre^slvk, 
what he was sayijag/t<j> us. 

A feeling op peace and goodwill seems to spread over all as 
we gather arouna bur Coaaticpr^FIre. Aunt Betty has so planned 
each one that tms tiufe^when we pause within the week holds a spec¬ 


ial 

our 


place 

minds 


oilr camp ife. And as 
the thought, 


we file slowly out, in 



n The embers of camp fire are now 
slowly dying 

The birds in the tree tops have 
to their nests. 


erone 


The stars twinkling o’er us, their 


light shines upon us. 
Oh, God of Nature, grant to us a 
peaceful rest.” 



































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TRIPS 


There is a magic word in camp. When 
uttered it electrifies the whole group for whom 
it is meant. A little five lettered word is this- 
TRIPS. This little word may mean a ride in The 
Covered Wagon; or the Beach Wagon; a canoe or 
boat. It will surely mean the scurry of 
rolling a pack, the checking and re-checking to 
see if everything from a tooth brush to woolen 
socks are tucked in; it will mean pup tents; 
it will mean being packed safely in* counted, 
checked, and being excitedly waved goodbye to. 
Oh-it is not possible to put in writing what a 
trip means. 

JUNIORS 



The JuniorB are too small to really take 
overnight trips; but they have done many interest¬ 
ing things near camp. There have been luncheon 
trips to The Point, Once about four o T clock 
word was spread that all the jolly juniors were 
off to supper. And so they were. Boats were 
made ready, food was s&6rod away, the crew got 
on board, and all the juniors sailed under the 
bridge and across the Cove for a grand time and 
a grand meal. Then there was the overnight trip. 
What if it was only from their cabin to the big 
grassy spot by the Lodged They might just as well 
have been miles away for imagination takes one 
lots of places,- and didn’t they sleep under the 
big tent that was on the Monhegan Trip; and didn’t 
they have a most exciting night away off from their 
cabin ’ They surely did. 





I5ER3T INTERMEDIATES 
Not only have the first intermediates 
had supper and luncheon trips out,- such as the day 
they went to Bunker Hill; but they have become 
experienced enough campers to go on overnight 
trips. The night on hook Out Mountain was one 
of their first adventures; and all declared that 
no more fun could have been had. Maybe they 
changed their minds after the Pemaquid Trip. 

This overnight stay by the sea coast was packed! 
full of adventure, and nearly everything was 
so different from camp. 1 



SECOND INTERMEDIATES 


The second intermediates also took a 
trip to Pemaquid. The beach, the fort and the 
lighthouse never seem to lose interest; and all, 
from councillors to the youngest first inter¬ 
mediates could sit b> -che cea and pla^ in the sand 
for hours. The second. intermediates were just as 


















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thrilled as the first; and no wonder* 
about the clams they had to eat J 


There was also another group that 
liked to get up high and look off over the iawm 

whole surrounding' countryside. Look-Out 
Mountain indeed needed to look out, when Peg’s \ f\\ 
car and the Nash approached with another group off / j ) 
campers for a good time,- experience in sleeping 1 j j j 
in packs, and in lending a willing hand in cook- YJ, Hj 
ing, or maybe K. P. duty after the meal. Not only Q si 
second intermediates went to Pemaquid. Some Senior Bf' 
went, too. They could build just as many cattles 
in the air as anyone; and from their reports, their 
broad smiles and sun-burned backs, no one need 
wonder whether or not the trip was a success 
for them. 



MOUNT APPETITE HIKE 

Remember the Mount Appetite hiking trip J 
Will you ever forget the answers Parc received 
when he went about asking if anyone had seen six 
girls, when he already had a car full? That was 
the day Peg-s famous Hoick decided to rest for 
arhile on the laurels of a burned-out bearing. That 
was the day we had George Ross’s ice cream . And 
that was the day just packed so full of adventures 
and funny happenings that eight o’clock had rolled 
by before the old Nash, which had served as a 
rescue car, and the Beach Wagon halted in front 
of the dining room, to leave fifteen sleepy, hungry 
happy hikers for a bite of supper; and then to 
bed and a long night's sleep. 



CANOE TRIPS 


AhJ for the elder groups the thrill of 
thrills, and the trips of the season are the two 
oanoe trips. 

THREE DAY TRIP: 


Perfect weather was ordered for the short 
canoe trip of two nights and three days; and off 
they paddled to find an island on which they 
might camp away from civilization. From there 
shorter explorations were under taken in all direct¬ 
ions, as the husky canoe crew put out for adventure. 
Their biggest adventure, however, was an attack 
on Molasses candy,- only to find it attacking 
them as nightmares; and creating a hair pulling 
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8 uch things add color to it all—tan in 
that case we should say— and the six canoes 
docked on schedule time Saturday noon, and ten 
tanned girls, with Jill and Edna as pilots, voted 
that the weather was only one of the perfect 
things about that short canoe trip. 

FIVE DAY TRIP 



No sooner was the short canoe trip over 
than Edna, with eleven girls, started on the 
longer one. The weather man decided that these 
older paddlers should not have such an easy 
time; and that he would test their camping ability. 
The weather man did not send enough rain to 
dampen their spirits, but just enough to try 
their skill. Fair weather was present the greater 
part of the whole ''trip. 

Those who went out on this five day trip 
will not soon forget it. The side trip to Damaris- 
cctta Mills, and about the lake from the campe 
site, will be vividly recalled for a long time. 

The high dive May Mat took, Edna nearly falling 
out of the canoe while taking pictures of rough {* '} 
water paddling, the dressing of the hens, one 
and. all will have to live in memory for alas 
and. alack i there was no film in that movie 
camera which took those pictures. Those hend « f 
0 'j.leo who swung the hatchet, and the rest are 
still laughing at this episode and at Zinny. 

They are also still laughing at the appearance 
of IT in a canoe; and only they can give an 
adequate and just description of their visitor. 

At the end ci five days, this was < 

another group cf canoers that appeared in The 
Cove and then back at the dock, at the close 
of a fine trip, tanned, and filled with exciting 
tales of those days away from camp. 



Thus to every season trips are bright 
spots that are talked over and over during camp 
season, and at any time when two campers meet. 
Packs rolled, food packed, off in the Covered 
Wagon, down the lake in a canoe, off op a trip- 
nothing like it J 





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What to do at the end of a busy day is never a question, 
for long, at camp. From the beginning, to the last, each week 
is filled with its entertainment at night. 


What is done all week? That is just what we tell on 
Monday nights when both camps meet in Memorial Hall and the 
Legs are read. All trips and happenings are described, and many 
of the funny happenings in both camps then come to public view. 


Tuesday, Wedn esday, 
nights hold ! Quite often 

W nvn /am V» c. ■*» "D ar V O C ^ ° 


Thursday {I 


R em enb e r V ar. o 
the maid? And 
Petty tried to 


Pi % 


the 

have 


What Possibilities those 
a play has been put on by some Cabin. 
SARD ILLS?? and Mabel as Aifreda, 


one Dakota 
a rummage 


and 

sal 


Algonquin put on, in which 


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belongings? And Cherokee in Beer 


01 ail the neighborhood 

_ Behave , when Betty got the 

worst end of a practical joke? Of course, the Cold Medal 
skit, displaying what the up-to-date Wawanock damper should wear, 
especially while riding, must be mentioned. 

Sometimes those nights have contained an evening sitting 
around the fire place, reading poetry, munching pop-corn. Some¬ 
times there have been parties, games, sings. But no matter what 
the evening, it was sure to be filled with a laughing, care¬ 
free group until time for taps. 


Friday nights brought two separate programs. At first 
our own Council Fires were held in the Council Ring. After this, 
once again we went up on the Drumlin to see the Marionette 
Shows so skillfully put on by Uncle Mark, and those who helped 
him. Little Red Riding Hood, Goldie Locks, Little Black Sambo, 
Jack and the Bean Stalk, Pet6r Rabbit, and Ali Baba and the 
Forty Thieves, are examples of what Uncle Mark could get puppets 
to do. These shows are greatly enjoyed. A great deal of work 
is necessary; and Uncle Mark and Mrs. Davis deserve much credit 
for these fine shows, not only this year, but last year as well. 


Strange sights could be seen around camp on Saturday 
afternoons. Hair would around curlers, waved on bobby pins, and 


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shoes cleaned. The occasion for .all.of-this was the Saturday 

night dance, and it was a perfect array of colors and curls 

that wended its way to the Drumlin on this social night of the week. 

Ellen Bailey, Sheldon Cady, and Uncle Max Brown have 
furnished the music, while Uncle Ed, assisted by some Wawanook 
councillors, directed -the dances. It is needless to say that 
all had a good time and that who danced n with who” was lived 
over again after the evening was finished. 

Sunday nights again found both camps assembling on the 
Drumlin. The singing of hymns and the hearing of stories 
formed an evening unlike any other during the week. Uncle Mark 
could get the groups to singing as they never sung before, and 
then was when we learned to know and to appreciate those old 
familiar songs. 


Thus the weeks sped by. Evening followed 
evening and from Burday night to Monday night there was fun. 

It is in the evenings + hat camp is gathered, all together in 
one large group. It in in such gatherings that camp as a whole 
plays, and,from Juniors to Seniors, learns to know and enejoy 
the comradeship of every single other camper. And at the end, 
as taps are sung, C'j - S'. Cu<Xj ain as all is quiet, and taps once 

more sounds out from the hill through the quiet air, another 
evening has ended and a. happy camp has gone to another good 
night's sleep. 


















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IN WINTERLAND 



Scene 1 — Aa the story opens, a mother is telling 
her children a. Winterland tale. The children grow 
weary and the mother sings them a lullaby in ‘ ■ 
which she tells them to dream about Winterland 

Scene 2— This scene takes place in Winterland .. 
nr the inhabitants are sad because the Storm 
King, much against the wishes of the Winter Queen* 
has imprisoned his beautiful daughter, Aurora, in 
a block of ice. Because of this, Aurora's 
light has not been seen for a long time, for 6he 
has not been able to play with her friends, the 
SUN and the RAINBOW FAIRIES, 


Scene 3— The setting for Scene three is at another 
part of Winterland, where Aurora is imprisoned in 
a block of ice. 

OAST OF CHARACTERS IN THE ORDER 
OF THEIR APPEARANCE 

Mother-Anne Pettingell 

Children— Patsy Damon, Florence Davis, Sarah Jean 

Wildman 

Winterland Children— Earl Cramer, Jimmie Anderson ,^ 

Walter Calahan,Happy Kirk, 

Jean Willey 

Bear— Ellen Wiggins 
Seal— Davis Swift 

Penguins—Leslie Cramer, Richard Woodcock, Billy 

Schneider, George Loder. 

North Wing-— Betty Willey 
Storm King— Charles Schneider 
Winter Queen—Patsy Damon 

Snowflakes—Carol Woodcock, Jean Andrews, Janet 

Benson, Elspeth Benson, Nancy Herr, 
Martha Little, Ruth Martin 
Icicles—Betsy Bennett, Sally Ann Cameron 
Night—Beverly Haddocks 
Stars-—Alice Steel, Dale Sturdy 
Frincess Aurora—Connie Sawyer 
Sun— Kathie Andrews 

Rainbow Fairies—Nancy Dorey, Jean Jeffers 




Stage Manager—Robert Little 

Assist. Stage Managers—Walter Anderson- 

Harry Calahan 




























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OPERA. NIGHT 
PINAFORE 


Jh* nslxlTh annual Opara, p-racontartion, in which boys and girls 
from both camps participated, was given on Tua«day- -evening before - 
the closing of camp on Wednesday, at Memorial Hall, before an 
audience of parerrtre-, -friends, and campers, which filled the - 
hall to capacity. 


Early in the season the fine old oper a PINAFORE was 
chosen and after many try-outsthe parts were assigned as follows: 


Rackstraw 

01r Joseph 

Captain 

Boatswain 

Deadeye 

Hebe 

Josephine 

Buttercup 


John Anthony 
Burton Knust 
Sheldon Cady 
Ernest Mariner 
Hamlin Dorman 
Carol Hoar 
Betty Tucker 
Marjorie Smith 


The Chorus Members were as follows: 


Judy Andrews 
Beverly F&vier 
Churlo11e Ca±ahan 
Jean Dickey 
Sally Dickey 
Margery Dow 
Mabel Estes 
Ellen Fairbank 
Jean Ferrell 
Jean Harriman 
Jane Heywood 
Elizabeth Jeffers 
Doris King 
Nancy Loder 
Carolyn Longshore 
Marcia Me Carthy 
Mary Martha Nichols 
Marjorie Palmer 
Loraine Philbrick 


Adlyn Purdy 
Edna Riley 
Ruth Riley 
Lucy Sampson 
Marjorie Sullivan 
Elizabeth Sweetland 
Lois Wallen 


-Boys- 

Albert Bertozzi 
William Blodgett 
John Blodgett 
Sammy Brown 
Edgar Curtis 
John Calahan 
Robert Davies 
Parker Dorman 


Sidney Ely 
Wayne Dorman 
Craig Fleming 
Donald Harms 
John Houston 
John Little 
Thomas Mitchell 
Thomas Purdy 
Robert Rippey 
David Sawyer 
Paul Tamarkin 
Karl Toner 
Eugene Woodcookk 


Costumes for the most part were found around camp, 
although several of the principals sported "store clothes" rented 
for the occasion, making a most colorful, if not too authentic, 
cosruming. 

The stage setting was the usual quarter deck of a ship, 
also rented for the occasion. 

The production was under the direction of Mr. Davis 
who was ably assiste-' by Miss Bailey at the piano. 

The annual presentation of some standard opera has 
become a feature of camp life eagerly anticipated by parents and 
campers; and this veer’s opera was thoroughly enjoyed. 










































































CUilP ACTIVITIES 





ARCHERY 


# Xshct an into ^he air, 

it fell to earth, I know not where.’' 
With all due apologies to a good 
poem, many a camper has felt the earns 
way when a buried arrow would not 
reveal its hiding place. 


many found that 


Of course, the best place in 

day archery ha. 

<»>• »' a “*- Sfe n . E .rr„fL« iS'tL^.fLsid, the 

hear a taut string sing and hear the arrow 
and more fun if it strikes between 


been a most fitting 
lake. It is fun to 
go whizzing through 
the white and gold 


the air; 


Archery, lik ® t ®™ i |{ w ay S a be 1 preIentt 1 the°thriir d of lth ° U8 
SSrS^ar^i^thfLSS^?; Sw-*. no matter 

where the archery enthusiast may shoot outside of c .. p. 


ARTS AND CRAFTS 


Leather, rope, felt, woo ^» ^ecte^the oamp^rts 

year. 


j ov ed pSlilrs/SdS” i“S ■ »“*. 

learner ^ , p hri+1ps a few have even made woven rope foot 

many colored bristle .At fa rite with the older group was 

t S he buff Ind green’felt' caps that could so quickly be made, and 
which represented camp colors 


In addition to the above things, knitting has been done 

■u v, n -p rtf harrm* for Mrs Davis has been a great help m 

bv over half of camp, ior mi t> .p-,,rvrj ■(-■hat stitches click 

S'ssar’Si.'s£.?s * 

the Log. 


The whole department has been very interesting and most 
successful; »„y ..A »t «««««»* Jo -cr^cuttei, 

j;S?“J so fascinating they did hot -i.h to 

leave it alone. 

















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CAMP CRAFT 


How in the world, do you roll a pack? You mean to tell 
me you actually sleep in those things? Such questions may have 
been asked the very first of camp, but not for long. Peg and Ruth 
have initiated all into the art of camping, for camping ie truly 
an art when the weather decides to be anything but all sunshine 
and fair. 

Patiently Peg has demonstrated pack rolling, where 
clothes should be placed, how it should be pinned, and the proper 
method of rolling and tying. It may look -easy, but some old 
campers have to think a bit from year to year before they can re¬ 
call the exact knack of getting a good bed that will be comfortable 
for sleep night after night. Then comes the erecting of pup 
tents;' and before the end of the season, every camp craft person 
should be able to put up one of these in record time. Then, too, 
fire places must be built, the fire carefully handled, and the 
camp site left in good condition. It is no small job to be a good 
away-from-the-cabin camper. 

Speaking of fire places should remind one of Ruth T s 
special part of camp craft—cooking. For if one is hungry, what 
is a good fireplace without food? This hour of the day was more 
than popular when Dame Rumor spread word that there would be some¬ 
thing cooked in those fire places. Of course what is cooked must 
be eaten. 


Camp craft is a very important part of any camper*s life, 
for no trip can be one hundred percent perfect unless what to do, 
when to do it, and how to do it, is known by everyone from the 
time she thinks about going until she gets back. And there cer¬ 
tainly is satisfaction in being able to go away from camp and take 
care of one’s self for a few days. 

CANOEING- AND ROWING 

How many times Echo Island has appeared as the smallest 
bit of vegetation in the lake and to be jumping all around. That 
is because some one in rowing was struggling to row there and 
back in a straight course. How many times some one on shore has 
gasped to see a fully clothed girl fall out of a canoe. That is 
because some one in canoeing was doing dumps and learning to take 
care of herself under all conditions. 

Boating is tackled with great ardor, for to pass boating 
means to be able to get into a canoe providing one has passed the 
swimming necessary for safety in case of a spill. And to pass 
boating means to be able to properly handle a boat at night on 
the lake during boating hour, and that i_s fun. Estelle and Ruth 
have handled boating well, and many have learned to feather their 
oars, land correctly, and to do all else a good boatsman should 
be able to do. 




























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Canoeing is ever popular. By 
the end of July twenty-one girls 
were able to canoe enough to ,ro on 
trips. Every morning Edna spent at 
the dock teaching how to take care of 
a canoe, how to place it in the water, 
how to paddle, and how to control 
a canoe in rough water, or emergen¬ 
cies of any sort. Assisted by Jill, 
she has aimed to make every one 
capable of handling a canoe safely 
and efficiently, and this is what 
any one who has become a bronze 
paddler is able to do. 

To really get some where in a boat or canoe is great sport. 
Many younger campers take just pride in their ability to row. And 
the older ones may not say so, but they, too, think just as much 
of it when they have mastered both boats and canoes in A-l manner. 

DANCING 



To mention dancing makes us think of the Wavus Elves as 
they silently approached from all corners of the lodge and then on 
light toes dance most gracefully for us. To mention dancing makes 
us think of those who learned more about ballroom steps and thus 
were able to enjoy Saturday nights a great deal more. To mention 
dancing also makes ns remember the operetta the young folks had, 
and the clever numbers put on by the juniors and the first inter¬ 
mediates. To mention operetta and the dancing makes us want to 
tell you that it was because of Cathy that hands and feet grew more 
graceful, little ones learned to notice time and rhythm, and to 
tell what steps to do by merely listening to Ellen’s playing the 
tune on the piano. Anyone who has seen what Cathy can accomplish 
in eight short weeks will acknowledge that even in camp with all 
its outdoor life, dancing has a big place , for it becomes one of 
the joyful ways of expressing what is felt of happiness all 
bubbling inside. 

FENCING 


Maybe thoughts of fencing will at first bring memories 
of aching muscles, but aching muscles soon get limbered up, and 
before the season is over, they have acquired some of the rhythm 
and precision necessary in a good fencer. 

Again camp was fortunate in having as instructor, Uncle 
Ed, who is such an expert himself. As his quick commands were 
given there could be no slow thinking or reaction if one was to 
kdep up with him at all. But as one was learning, there was no 
more patient or thorough instructor than he. 

Fencing is one of the most valuable sports at camp. In 
this,perfect co-ordination is necessary and many a back has had 
to straighten up in self-defense if for no other reason. As one 
becomes more perfect and takes part in class fencing bouts, or 
Buff and Green matches, there is a thrill to hearing foil click 
on foil, or finding that one is lighter footed than an opponent, as 
Uncle Ed in crisp tones commands, '■ Carry ! Salute On Guard 
Step back i Fence 11 

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FIRST AID 


No trip ever goes out without a first-aid kit along. No 

camper ever earned any award from a,W to a Gold Medal without 
adding more to her knowledge about the make-up of the body, and 
what to do in case of a broken bone, or cut, or other such accident 
which one hopes never will happen but which one must be able to 
meet if they should occur. 

Both Mrs. Haddocks and Miss Rus3ell have given expert 
instruction. Because of the hours these two put in, many a camper 
working on first-aid points now knows what are veins, what are 
arteries, and what constitutes smooth and suitable bandage for 
many types of injuries. And many a camper will find that the use 
of this knowledge does not end just because oamp is over and they 
are off to another type of life. _ 

HIKING 


Pessimists tell us that walking has become a lost art. 
Pessimists apparently never went to camp. Just let those pessimists 
visit Wawanock for a while and see. First they would meet Ellen 
who would say to them, 11 This is a fine day for a hike. How many 
would like to go? w Next they would be surrounded by those eager 
to be off and back again in time for swim. These pessimists would 
be swept along to the infirmary where they would find that all 
were checked for the right type of sock and the proper shoes,- 
remember, pessimists, no sneakers on our jaunts. 

Then merrily the group would swing along with Ellen and 
maybe Ruth or Carolyn might be present> too. There is nothing 
like it for comradeship, fun, and appreciation of what is seen 
on every hand. Birds, flowers, and trees all make up a part of 
the striding along, and perhaps a song or two swings the step into 
a livelier rhythm. 

As these jolly hikers approach camp again, they meet 
the pessimists who sat down on a rock and sulked because they were 
wrong—completely wrong. Grumpily the pessimists join the group 
again, see them all checked in at the infirmary, then scatter 
hurriedly in all directions as they wave a cheery °good bye u 
and dash for a swim. 

There—that is a sample hike with Ellen in charge and you 
can be sure that she is no pessimist and you cafc be sure that hiking 
is far from a lost art around here. 

NATURE 


Five-thirty, time to get up. Who in the world is stirring 
at that early hour? No other than Peggy waking up sleepy-heads 
for an early morning bird walk. Maybe the early birds get the 
worm; but these early risers got the birds. After these walks, 
many more campers could call the birds by name and really felt 
acquainted with the feathered folk. 

Birds were not all of the nature study by any means. 

Nearly everything from stars to moss was taken up sometime during 
the camp season, and both Peg and Mrs. Benson , surrounded 










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by a group of campers often could be 
seen during the day examining some 
object in order to learn its identi¬ 
fication. And Ellen with a group of 
star gazers all about her was a famil¬ 
iar sight down by the bridge on 
clear nights. Interest in nature has 
been greatly increased by the nature 
questions which Aunt Betty has posted 
each day on the dining room door. The 
teams have seen xvhich could have the 
greatest number of answers to each 
day's question. 

Oamp life grows in interest as one learns to appreciate 
the nature that is on every side; and this year with its early 
morning bird walks, the star gazing nights; and the nature questions 
has awakened a desire to know more about what surrounds us. 

RIDING 



Over the roads and along the trails on horseback is just 
what afternoons at camp are for. As the different paces were tried 
out first in the paddocks, Uncle Jack and Jill have taught those 
who were a wee bit timid to like horses and riding. For the more 
experienced riders the open roads have been the places for an 
hour ' s fun. 

As the season progressed and the riders became more sure 
of themselves, longer rides across fields, through shady nooks, 
and around about to the barn again were taken. Afternoon trips 
were not the only ones, though, for the boys were out of camp some 
of the time, and then the older groups will not forget dashing 
into riding clothes after assembly—off to the barn and to a 
luncheon trip—oh, maybe to Bunker Hill, or on one of the many 
other roads that lead from camp. 

Such occasions made this activity even more popular with 
those who took it, and funny experiences,from absent-minded 
swinging on a tree limb to sitting in a bees' nest were gone through. 
But no casualties resulted—no, not even from the bees’ nest. 

RIFLERY 

Saturday at camp is a banner day for many, for it is then 
that the rifle awards are given out. This day proves that boys are 
not the only ones wirh a clear eye and a steady nerve; Uncle Owen 
during a season has taught old and young the proper care of a gun, 
and the proper method of shooting it. The record on Saturdays 
leaves no doubt as to the ability of both Uncle Owen and those who 
take riflery. 

This year even some of the first intermediates have won 
their Pro-marksman Hedal, and some of the seniors have earned as 
high as their fourth or fifth bar on their Sharpshooter award, 
which means shooting forty or better our of fifty in the various 
positions, depending on which bar is being worked for. 

Uncle Owen deserves a gjeat deal of credit in the way he 
handles this department, llany have learned from it and from Uncle 
















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Owen not only how to shoot, but th 
to keep at a thing and to determine 
to better one's own record, holds 
in itself a zest that carries over 
from riflery to other activities as 
well. That is what we call really 
becoming a straight shooter. 

SAILING ' 

Hew thrilled everyone was the 
afternoon the sail boat came 
gracefully into dock. This is the 
one that Peg helped build during 
the winter months, and which has 
given pleasure to many during the 

summer. Though she has not always had the time, or the weather 
to teach as much about sailing as she desired, this summer will 
serve to introduce it to camp. We hope next summer will find it 
a regular camp activity, for there has been nothing in camp that 
has been more admired than the boat, or more sought after than 
to be in it as its sail unfurls with the breeze and the boat 
skims across the lake. 

SPORTS AND GAMES 

In the morning, bats, balls, croquet sets—all are apt 
to be in use, for then is one of the main thmes for sports and 
games. Besides all their other games, Aunt Betty has been 
referee for the first intermediates during many a hard-played 
contest of servus ball or volley call between the pines by the 
Lodge; while Lucia and Stel have supervised everything from 
jackstones and cootie for fun on rainy days, to all of the 
outdoor sports for the older groups . 

These sports, however, have a place not only on the 
morning and regular program, but what skill is learned,when 
Buff and Green compcTition games are played. Though technique 
is important in a game, it is not all that is learned in these 
daily contests. There toe is learned the art of being a good 
sport, of winning and losing as a true camper should. This 
lesson, learned in these daily contests of fun, often proves to be 
of far more value than just skill when Buff and Green games are at 
i e nv e . 

SWIMhI NG 

When the skies are blue and the crickets are singing their 
song of hot weather, no one has to be coaxed to go into the water. 

A few do have to be coaxed, though, to learn how to swim. Every 
swim period and every afternoon has found Lucia and Estelle saying 
"Stroke, pull, together. 1 " over and over agaih. Gradually feet and 
arms are straightened out; real force instead of wasted energy 
has been acquired, and a swimmer has developed. 

In the morning, joining hands with the ten jolly Juniors 
they have indeed made both Juniors and the swim jolly, as they 
played Ring-around-tne-Rosy, and then ducked down to get wet; or 
became turtles or motor-boats, and floated or blew bubbles in 
the water. Not all the Juniors learned to swim.Almost all did 








































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learn the dog-paddle, and some even developed a nice side-stroke 
before the end of the summer. Although not all learned to swim , 
every single one lost her fear of -the'water, and learned that 
she could play in it and have fun. That is the biggest step. It- 
--requires time and patience. By the end of next summer, because 
another year will be added and strength gained, we hope all the 
jolly Juniors will be doing more than the dog-paddle. 

Some of the older groups too have had to start almost from 
the beginning; all have learned proper strokes; and many have 
found out that diving in the water is much more fun than wading 
in. This summer has also been a profitable one for those taking 
life-saving. Some have renewed their badges and others have 
passed the test for the first time. 


So, for all 
Lucia have made the 
all the rubber rafts 
habe been ail work, 
weather man, rwimmir.-. 
time. And whether w 
around for the fun, 
there is no time lik 


, from life-savers to the Juniors, Stel and 
season a profitable one. Morning swims, with 
and balls, have been play times. Afternoons 
Between the two, and a fairly generous fair 
g has been both an accomplishment and a good 
ojfung for something definite, just paddling 
or even in for a dip to get both eyes open, 
e swimming in those good old camping days. 


TENNIS 


Carol’s one aim all summer has been to develop tennis 
players. Day after day she has spent on the courts and scoffed 
at the idea that it might be work , as long as someone was 
interested and was learning serves and good form on strokes. 

The time spent and her enthusiasm brought results. In 
the middle of the summer, a tournament was held just for the fun 
of playing. Later in 4ugust , the real Buff and Green 
tournament aroused mere interest and was run off more smoothly 
because each cr.e realized better what she was doing. The Buff 
and Green tournament showed that the summer’s work was well done, 
for a great deal of irmrrvad playing was evident. This summer 
the courts have beer, in use a great deal of the time. Even 
before the rising bell, some wide-awake people had made use of 
the time, ‘'irom then until after boating hour tennis could be 
seen in progress almost any part of the day. 

Thio enthusiasm in a game that can be used outside of 
oamp is splendid, indeed. All the credit for the improved playing 
and for the interest in it rests entirely with Carol who made 
this activity the real alive one that it was all summer. 


































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INDEX TO THE CABIN PICTURES 
(All rows read from left to rig*ht) 

1. Gold Medal-3.R. Gladys Ycurr?, Ellen Fairbank, Sally Dickey, 

Adalyn Purdy 

F.R.~ Jane Hayward,Mary Martha Nichole,Merdy Dow 

2. Penobscot- 

3.R. Mabel Estes, Esther Frost,Marjorie Smith, 

Betty Tucker 

F.R. Joanne Stull, Ruth Riley 

3. Cayuga— 

3. R. Elizabeth Sweetland, Edna Chamberlain, 

Lorraine Philbrick 

F. R. Carolyn Longshore,Jean Dickey,Marjorie Palmer 

4. Narrayaneett- 

B. R. Marjorie Sullivan, Estelle Litchfield,Carol 
Hoar 

F.R. Lois Wallen, Edna Riley Barbara Sellew 

5. Dakota- 

E. R. Ruth Whelden, Eeverly Bavier . Doris Kinw* 

F. R. Judy Andrews, Marcia McCarthy 

6. Cherokee- 

B. R. Lucy Sampson, Pesiry Andrews, Nancy Loder 
F. R. Marian Purinton ( not in picture) 

7. Algonquin- 

3. R. Lydia Longshore, Jean Ferrell 

F. R* Jpan Harriman, Carolvn Blake, Charlotte Calahan 

8. Omaha- 




B. R. Anne Pettinsrell, Lucia Rose 

F. R. Beverly Haddocks, Eetty Willey 

9. 

Shawnee- 

B. R. Ellen Wi^y-ins, Ellen Bailey, Sally Ann Cameron 
F. R. Patsy Damon, Eathie Andrews 

10. 

Pueblo- 

3. R. Bjtsy Bennett, Mrs. Steel, Dale Sturdy 

F. R. Eleanor Clayton, Constance Sawyer, Alice Steel. 

11. 

Oea^e- 

3. R. Jean Willey, Mrs. Sawyer, Florence Davis 

F. R. Janet Benson, Happy Kirk, Ruth Martin 

12. 

Mo hawk- 

B. R. Jean Andrews, Mrs. Benson, Elspeth Benson 

F. R. Carol Woodcock, Martha Little 

13. 

Au rust 

Campers- 

5. R. Sarah Jane Wildman, Mary Jonathan, Betty 


Jeffers, Alice Paul 

F. R. Jean Jeffers, Nancy Herr, Nancy Dorey 

























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NAMES AND ADDRESSES 


Andrews, Jean 
Andrews, Katherine 
Andrews, Julia 
Bavier, Beverly 
Bennett, Betsy 
Benson, Janet 
Benson, E'.l speth 
,0 el fchan, Cha rl o 11 e 
O'am e ro n, Sal 1 y Ann 
. Clark, Martha 
Clayton,,Eleanor 
Damon, Patrica 
Davis, Florence 
Dickey, Jean 
Dickey, Sallie 
Dorey, Nancy 
Dow. Margery— 

Estes, Mabel 
Fairbank, Ellen 
Ferrell, Jeane 
Harrirr.an, Jean 
Hayward, Jane 
Herr, Nancy 
Hoar, Carol 
Jeffers, Elizabeth 
Jeffers, Jean 
King, Doris 
Kirk, Harriet 
Little, Martha 
Loder, Nancy 
Longshore, Carolyn 
Longshore, Lydia 
McCarthy, Marcia 
Haddocks, Beverly 
Martin, Ruth 
Nichols, Mary Martha 
Palmer, Marjorie 
Paul, Alice 
Pettingell, Anne 
Philbrick, Lorraine 
Purdy, Adalyn V 
Purinton, Marian 
Riley, Edna 
Riley, Ruth 
8Mmpson, Lucy 
Sawyer, Constance, 
Sellew, Barbara 
Smith, Marjorie 
Steel, Alicd“ Mildred 
Stull, Joanne 
Sturdy, Dale 
Sullivan, Marjorie 
8weetland, Elizabeth 


261 Overlook Road, New Rochelle,N.Y, 

261 Overlook Road, New Rochelle N.Y. 

261 Overlook Road, New Rochelle N.Y. 

120 Argyle Avenue, New Rochelle,N.Y. 

80 Grotto Avenue, -Providence-, R.I* 

23 Channing Rdad, Belmont, Mas6 
23 Channing Road, Belmont, Mass 
Summer Street, Box 67, Norwood, N. J, 
120 Slater Avenue, Providence, R.I. 

7 East Blackthorn St.,Chevy Chase,Md. 
165 Taber Avenue, Providence, R.I. 

24 Alpine Street, Malden, Mass. 

30 State Street, Rockland, Maine 
76 Beverly Rd. Upper Montclair,N.J . 

76 Beverly Rd. Upper Montclair,N.J. 

251 Mill Street,Eelmont, Maes. 

37 College Street,•Portland, Me, 

90 Bancroft St., Reading, Mass. 

415 Monroe St.,New Britain ,Conn. 

12 Dalton Street, Waterville, Maine 

34 Woodrow St., West Hartford, Conn. 
Orange, Conn. 

SaylSeville, R. I. 

19 Murry Street, New Britain, Conn 
103 Bellevue Ave.Upper Montclair,N.J 
103 Bellevue Avenue,Upper Montclair, 
139 Valley Stream Rd. Larchmont ,N|-Y. 

60 Beverly Ed.West Hartford, Conn. 

22 Maynard St. Pawtucket, R, I, 

78 Beverly Rd.Upper Montclair, N.Jf,, 

106 Bellevue Ave.Melrose, Mass. 

106 Bellevue Ave.Melrose, Mass 

61 Benton Ave.Waterville, Maine. 

16-J Center Street, Waterville, Me. 

6 Hillside Terrace, Belmont, Mass 
439 Edgewood Ave. New Haven, Conn. 

54 Townsend Rd.Belmont, Mass. 

State Theater, Waterville, Maine 
53 Raleigh Road, Belmont, Maes. 

8 Carleton Road, Belmont, Mass. 

96 Sherman St., Hartford, Conn. 

97 Stone Street, Augusta, Maine. 

85 South St.,Portland, Maine. 

196 Taber Ave., Providence, R. I. 

10 Indian Hill Rd. Belmont, Mass. 

138 Nichols St., Lewiston, Maine. 

48 Congress Ave, Providence, R. I. 

153 Midway St.,Providence, R. I, 

35 Sunset Court, St. Louis, Missouri 
286 Hillside Ave.Pawtucket, R.I, 

21 Alfred Downe Rd. W. Barrington,R.I, 

91 Court St. Augusta, Maine. 

16 Cole Ave., Providence, R.I, 


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Tucker, Betty- 
Wallen, Lois 
Wiggin, Ellen 
Wildman, Sarah. Jean 
Willey, Betty 
Willey, Jean 
Woodcock, Carol 


5 Hunting Street, No,Attleboro, Mass 
ML 7 8 So.Main St.,West Hartford,COnn. 

25 Kilmer Road, Larchmont, N. Y. 

36 Hurd Road, Belmont, Mass. 

300 Farmington Ave. Cranston, R. I. 

300 Farmington Ave - . crranetoxx, 

8G Russell StLewiston, Maine. 


COUNCILLORS 


Andrews, Mr. and Mrs. D.E2 
Andrews, Margaret 
Bailey, Ellen 
Eenson, Mrs. Glion 
Pennett, Mrs. Albert 
Blake, Carolyn 
Cass, Edward 

Chamberlain, Mr. and Mrs. Cal 
Davis, Mr. and Mrs. Mark 
Frost, Mr. and Mrs. Theodore 

Gleeb, Mr. and Mrs. Owen 
Litchfield, Estelle, 
Maddocks, Mrs. ferry 
Rose, Lucia 
Russel 1, Miss Nina 
£a v 7 er, Mrs. William 
£teel, Mrs. Roy F. 

Whs1den, Ruth 

Woodcock, Mr. and Mrs. Karl 
\/cung, Gladys 


1 ^ 


Jefferson, Maine. 
Jefferson, Maine. 
Booth Hill Rd. No.Scituate,Mass. 

38 Channing Rd. Belmont, Mass. 

80 Grotto Ave. Providence, R.I. v 
38 Kimball St. Needham, Mass. 

159 Hancock St. Cambridge, Mass, 
vin 103 Nichols St. Norwood, Maes. 

110 So. Main St. West Hartford,Conn 
University of Chicago,Elementary 
School, Chicago, Ill. 

21 Essex St., Framingham, Mass. 

8 Brew Street, Augusta, Maine. 

I67 Center St., Waterville, Maine' 
178 Veranda St. Portland, Maine 
25 Whitney St., Auburn, Maine 
138 Nichols St. Lewiston, Maine. 

35 Sunset Court, St. Louis, Missouri 
20 Soane Ave., Providence, R. I. 

86 Russell St., Lewiston, Maine. 

119 Cony Street, Augusta, Maine. 


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